Spark Your Creativity with a Dream Journal

We are so captivated by and entangled in our subjective consciousness that we have forgotten the age-old fact that God speaks chiefly through dreams and visions. C.G. Jung

Famous Creative Dreamers:

tree2Our dreams can serve as a rich source of inspiration for creative work. If you dismiss your dreams as being wild and impractical, think again.

Freidrich August von Kekule was sleeping when he dreamed of a snake biting its own tail. This provided him with the idea he needed to visualize the structure of the benzene molecule and birth the field of organic chemistry.

A dream helped Nobel prizewinner Otto Lowei discover that chemical messengers and neurotransmitters were responsible for the flow of information in the human brain.

Mozart often dreamed his music before he wrote the compositions.

A dream about warriors carrying spears with holes near their tips gave Elias Howe, the sewing machine’s inventor, the clue he needed to solve the problem of how to make his invention sew without tangling the thread.

Many authors rely on their dreams as inspiration for their works. Some have even dreamed entire books. Read more about writers who work with their dreams.

Harness the Creative Power of Your Dreams:

We dream every single night, but often we forget our dreams. The tree2key to remembering dreams is to set the intention before you sleep that you will dream creatively and will recall your dreams.

Focus on the solution or inspiration you seek from your dreams. Some dreamers like to write these dream requests in their journals or on a slip of paper they place beneath their pillows before they sleep. Just before you go to sleep, clear your mind and relax.

Keep your dream journal and a pen or pencil near your bed.

As soon as you awaken in the morning grab your notepad and write your dreams. If you don’t remember a dream, write the first thing that pops into your mind.

Write or doodle as fast as you can. Focus on the feeling of the dream, list the symbols, and note the colors and the people who were present.

Instead of analyzing your dream by working with it, play with it.

  • Free associate images or words this dream evokes.
  • Write a poem about your dream.
  • Turn your dream into a fable.
  • Draw or paint a picture of your dream.

When you’ve played with your dream, dialog with a dream character or a symbol and record it in your journal. Some questions you may want to ask are:

  • Who are you?
  • Why are you in my dream?
  • What are you trying to teach me?
  • How do you want me to act on that knowledge?

Sweet Dreams …

Learn How Creativity Coaching Can Help Make Your Dreams Come True

 

Books about Creative Dreaming:

The Art of Dreaming: A Creativity Toolbox for Dreamwork
by Jill Mellick, Ph.D.
Conari Press, 2001
dreamMellick, a clinical psychologist and registered expressive arts therapist, details a multitude of ways to decipher your dreams. She covers painting, ceramics, dancing, mask making, and poetry.

Dreamwork for the Soul: A Spiritual Guide to Dream Interpretation
by Rosemary Ellen Guiley
Berkeley Publishing Group, 1998
Guiley presents a seven step method that focuses on personal symbols.

Dreaming on the Net: Web Sites about Dreaming:

The Way of the Dreamer
Author Robert Moss, who created this site, offers articles, links, a forum for sharing dreams and techniques for dreamwork. The focus is on active dreaming here. His articles on putting yourself in the twilight zone and dreaming like an Egyptian are especially intriguing.

Virtual Sleep and Dreaming Community
This site began as a way to globally network dream researchers so that they could share their work. Over time it has evolved into an international dream sharing community. Richard Catlett Wilkerson, offers the free online Electric Dreams ezine as well as classes. The list of dream links he has collected is awesome.

Association for the Study of Dreams
A research and information exchange in the public and academic arenas, this extensive site contains a dream art exhibit, a nightmare forum and a number of excellent articles and links.